elections

U.S. Politics Isn’t ‘Polarized’; It’s In Almost Universal Agreement

Caitlin JOHNSTONE
When you look at US politics, it appears as though there are two mainstream political factions that very strongly disagree with one another. “Divided” is a word that comes up a lot. “Polarized” is another.
It is of course true that a whole lot of emotion flows between these two factions, and most of it is indeed negative. The hot topics of any given news cycle in America will typically involve more than one story pertaining to the vitriolic enmity between them.

The Race Tilts to Biden

Pundits of Right and Left alike would always prefer to stick to their dead clichés rather than bothering an even switching on a TV or a podcast, let alone going anywhere to see things for themselves. In the current U.S. presidential election it is happening again. Anyone who has bothered to actually sit through any of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s campaign speeches over the past week since his nationally televised debate with President Donald Trump should have seen several obvious points immediately.